Greek Colony

The lands of the Greek Colony were purchased by wealthy members of the Greek Orthodox community in the early 20th century. Archimandrite Euphthymios of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre encouraged them to establish a neighborhood outside the Old City's overcrowded Christian Quarter. Architect Spyros Houri designed the first twenty homes and a community centre before World War I. Most of the Greek Orthodox residents fled before the Israeli War of Independence in 1948. After the war, apartment blocks were hastily built to accommodate large numbers of Jewish immigrants from Yemen and Morocco. The Greek Colony community centre, consisting of five buildings, organizes regular cultural activities that include traditional Greek dancing and Greek language classes. The Greek Consulate in Jerusalem is located in the Greek Colony, at the junction of Rachel Imeinu and Tel Chai. A popular attraction in the neighborhood is the Greek Community Center, built in the year 1902 at Joshua Bin Nun Street. The community center, Beit Elisheva, at the corner of Hizkiyahu and Elazar Hamodai, was built in 1962. The birthing hospital, Misgav Ledach, which was originally established in 1854 in the Old City of Jerusalem, funded by the Rothschild family, was later moved to the Greek Colony, and has been there since then. Today, it has become one of the more expensive and desirable neighborhoods in Jerusalem due to its proximity to the Old City. And a lot of new immigrants from Europe,united state and Canada bought apartments in this area in the last 20 years, a main cause to the increasing value of apartments and private houses in the area. The Neighborhood is located right next to the main street of Emek Refaim with its ambiance. The surrounding neighborhoods are the German colony,Talbieh, Baka and Old katamon. The residents are middle- and upper-class and are a mixture of national religious and secular. Public Transportation: bus stations: 7.

Greek Colony